North York Moors

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Conservation tasks

Planning treesPlanning trees

If you think your group would enjoy a day out doing something really hands on, practical and satisfying, why not try a conservation taster day and help care for the National Park at the same time? We also have a series of funded  programmes working with young people over an extended period.

The type of work available depends on the time of year and the age, ability and size of your group. Examples of tasks include: dry stone walling, coppicing, tree planting, seed collecting, building bird, bat or bug boxes, footpath maintenance and bracken clearing.

Young Rangers

Are you looking for a regular way to volunteer in the National Park? Interested in a programme which meets the requirements of the Duke of Edinburgh Award (volunteer and skill elements)? Do you want to gain practical conservation experience and understand what a ranger does to protect some of the UK's most special landscapes? Meeting twice a month (once in the North and once in the South of the National Park), this is a free inclusive group for individuals living in and around the National Park. Contact us for more details.

Young people who take part in conservation tasks are opened up to the natural environment and gain understanding of the importance of conservation and the environment. While working on short projects or attending the Young Ranger club young people are able to work towards The John Muir Award, The Duke of Edinburgh Award sections and the Queen’s Award.

School Youth Engagement Projects

The North York Moors National Park Authority is engaging with young people from in and around the park to increase knowledge and experience of the environment and how to conserve it. The National Park offers activities which can complement curriculum, awards and target outcomes. By taking part in activities young people are able to improve their learning and life chances and enhance their personal and social development through experiential learning.

Working with young people at risk of exclusion through this project, we have seen student’s attendance levels increase on activity days. As well as witnessing their ability to manage risk and adopt a positive attitude while modifying aspects of behaviour that may otherwise restrict their own achievements.

Students gain transferrable skills for both the world around them and future work places. They learn how to take ownership, responsibility, initiative, leadership, perseverance, confidence and much more. This in turn has proven to aid students on a path of improvement and help develop a ‘can-do’ attitude.

Feedback from teachers;

‘Working with the North York Moors National Park Authority has really enabled some of our most hard to reach students to ‘come alive’ and really show themselves in a positive light’ Holly McFarlane, Acklam Grange School (July 2017)

‘I am really pleased that pupils chose to use their day volunteering. They did a fantastic job and should be proud of themselves.’ Andrew Gee, Ryedale School (August 2017)

Health and safety

All activities are lead by appropriately qualified and experienced supervisors from the National Park Authority. All activities begin with an introductory session on safety procedures and full risk assessment reports are available on request.

Clothing and equipment

Participants should wear old clothes and sturdy walking boots or boots with steel toe caps. Trainers and sandals are not permitted. Protective gloves are provided where required but participants should bring a pair of thick gardening gloves if they have any.

Physical activity

Come prepared for quite hard physical work. Note that some activities involve lifting, particularly dry stone walling, and these may not be suitable for people with back problems.

Contact 

The Education Service 

01439 772700

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