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Stokesley

Stokesley Market Place by Volunteer Brian NicholsonStokesley Market Place by Volunteer Brian Nicholson

The market town of Stokesley lies on the River Leven, just outside the northwestern boundary of the National Park. 

It has many historic features, including a 17th-century packhorse bridge over the River Leven, as well as a number of Georgian buildings. An impressive town hall, manor house and a conservation area of listed buildings indicate its past prosperity. Many small industries have taken place here over the years, including weaving, the manufacture of linen, brewing, printing and publishing. A water mill was recorded in the Domesday book and a preserved mill wheel is located at the entrance to the town near the River Leven.

Great Ayton (with its Captain Cook connections), Roseberry Topping and the National Park are all a short distance away.

What to see and do

Stokesley received its market charter in the 13th century, and the weekly market is still held every Friday on the large market square, in front of the town hall. 

Stokesley Farmers’ Market (first Saturday of the month) is also well worth visiting – it was voted ‘National Farmers’ Market of the Year’ in 2014. 

Nearby trips

Stokesley is a good base for exploring the North York Moors, with the Cleveland Way and the Coast to Coast path easily accessible. Bilsdale and the Esk Valley are just a short drive away. The celebrated navigator Captain Cook went to school in nearby Great Ayton, while a walk up the iconic hill of Roseberry Topping gives outstanding views of the area. 

Activities

Stokesley Leisure Centre – multi-station gym, sports hall, squash courts, spinning studio, swimming pool, floodlit pitch.

Sport – cricket, tennis, bowls, football.

Stokesley Golf Range – 9-hole course, floodlit driving range, crazy golf and footgolf.

Zenith Leisure – adventure days and outdoor activities for groups, schools, families and individuals.

Events

The annual Stokesley Show started in 1859 and is billed as the North’s largest one-day agricultural show. It’s always held on the Saturday following the third Thursday in September. During the week leading up to the Show, a large fair takes over the town's High Street and is in operation from the Wednesday evening.