North York Moors

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Snickets, Stones and Streams

Friday 20 June to Sunday 20 July

Free Entry: 10.00am to 5pm, daily

Meet the Artists: Saturday 21 June, 12 noon to 3pm, with medieval and renaissance music by the Caedmon Ensemble.

Running water, moss-covered boulders, intricate geological formations and man's stamp on the landscape - all combine to inspire the mixed-media embroidery of Sue Pilkington-Hanna, ceramics by John Egerton, hand-spun and knitted jewellery by Lisa Armstrong and Sarah Garforth's oil paintings.

Sue Pilkington-Hanna 

Sue Pilkington-Hanna is a freelance embroiderer, textile restorer, lecturer and tutor who works from her studio in Whitby. Certified by the Royal School of Needlework, she has become recognised as an international textile artist.

Her extensive travels have enabled her to draw on worldwide techniques while putting put her own twist on them. freelance embroiderer, textile restorer, lecturer and tutor who works from her studio in Whitby. Certified by the Royal School of Needlework, she has become recognised as an international textile artist.

Sue has worked on a wide range of textile-related projects, from the archiving and restoration of the Jesuit Collection of ecclesiastical vestments at Stonyhurst College to exhibiting in the international Cow Parade exhibition of 2004. She has pieces on show in various cathedrals and churches as well as in private collections.

In her latest work, Sue combines her passion for textiles with her love of the flora and fauna of the North York Moors.

Using silk and wool threads on painted backgrounds, her pieces evoke the grandeur of nature, including the ruffling of birds’ feathers, the delicacy of petals, the fragility of butterflies’ wings and the permanency of fossils. A microscopic investigation of seaweed has also inspired Sue to pursue non-representational images in her mixed media work. 

John Egerton 

Potter and artist John Egerton of Sneaton Pottery has been working at his craft for 50 years.

After studying Design at Scarborough College of Art, John moved to London to train as a teacher at the Hornsey College of Art. In 1965, shortly after qualifying, he returned to his beloved North Yorkshire and established his first pottery workshop in an outbuilding at his parents’ home. He still lives and works in Sneaton today.

In the early days John made thrown earthenware but in 1970 he changed to oxidized stoneware, fired in an electric kiln, which broadened the range of techniques at his disposal.

Few galleries at the time were prepared to take a chance on a young, unknown potter, though fortunately rustic earthenware was still fashionable and John managed to establish his business.

Over the years John has developed his own, very recognisable, style, inspired by nature in all its wonderful forms – from plant life and rock formations to the landscapes and seascapes of his home.

Following bisque firing, one or more glazes are applied and John’s design is etched through this onto the pot surface. The decoration varies from floral motifs, fish and fossils to simple linear designs. Extra glaze can then be painted or poured onto the pot, which is fired a second time. 

By mixing glazes, adding oxides or simply over-glazing John can achieve a wide range of ceramic effects, and continues to discover new sources of inspiration. Occasionally he experiments in hand-building his pots but the majority of his work is thrown.

John is still potting with great enthusiasm, 50 years after he started. He shows no signs of easing up and still runs workshops for fellow enthusiasts.