North York Moors

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Rights of way

Cleveland Way north of Sutton Bank by Mike KiplingCleveland Way north of Sutton Bank by Mike Kipling

COVID-19 update - 5 January 2021

With a National lockdown now in place, Government has stated that you must stay at home except where you have a ‘reasonable excuse’. This does include exercising (once a day), but not for the purpose of recreation or leisure (e.g. a picnic or a social meeting). You can exercise in a public outdoor place local to you with people you live with, your support bubble (or as part of a childcare bubble), or, when on your own, with one other person. As not everyone has easy access to green space, you are allowed to travel a short distance within your local area to do so.

We know how important accessing the National Park is to your health and wellbeing and therefore all our car parks and toilets remain open for local use. Public rights of way everywhere remain open as permitted by law but we ask you to observe social distancing guidelines. This includes staying two metres apart from anyone not in your own household or part of your support bubble. Bring hand sanitiser for use after touching shared surfaces (gates, stiles etc) and wash your hands as soon as you are back indoors.

If you are only a short distance away and thinking of exercising here, we ask you to follow Government’s rules on exercising and meeting other people when visiting and to follow our guidelines for accessing the National Park responsibly.

The National Park will be here waiting for you to enjoy fully when it is safe to do so and we look forward to welcoming you back then.


The freedom to roam across beautiful and dramatic landscapes was a major incentive behind the creation of our National Parks and for many visitors the ability to get away from roads and traffic is a vital part of their visit.

Around 2,200km (1,400 miles) of public rights of way allows walkers, horse-riders and cyclists to access the North York Moors National Park and the vast majority of the open moorland, as well as Forestry England woodland, is now open access land and can be explored on foot.

The National Park Authority is responsible for the maintenance of public rights of way. See current rights of way notices. To view recent changes to public paths see our Recent changes to Public Paths page.

Helping us

If you find a problem on a right of way in the North York Moors, please let us know so we can put it right. You can email us using the contact below or by completing the online form. In order to ensure we can react to the problem as quickly as possible, please provide an accurate grid reference using an OS map. If possible, take a photo too.

When a problem report is received, we will investigate the issue within 28 working days. All Rights of Way work undertaken by the National Park Authority is dealt with on a priority basis, subject to the availability of resources. Reports of items considered dangerous anywhere on the network will be investigated and made safe as soon as possible where this is a National Park responsibility. In many cases, maintenance responsibility for furniture items and obstructions will lie with the landowner.

Contact

Julia Jewitt, Technical Assistant (Ranger Services)
T: 01439 772700
E: paths@northyorkmoors.org.uk

Rights of way map

To find out more about where to walk, ride and cycle in the North York Moors National Park have a look at our interactive rights of way map (updated daily). You can zoom in and out at various scales by following the instructions displayed underneath the map and by using the Legend and Layer buttons you can see all Public Rights of Way.

You can also find out if there are any stiles, steps, gates or bridges on the paths and where there are sign-posts. This is helpful for route-finding or for picking an easier access walk if someone in your group, or your dog, finds stiles tricky. The furniture items are regularly updated, but are not guaranteed as they do change with land management needs – after all, stiles and gates are only there to keep livestock in... or out.